The Fall of a Queen: Anne of Cleves

After the death of his third wife, Henry VIII was in mourning for at least a couple of months. Once he came out of his very brief period of mourning it was time to consider a fourth bride – a foreign bride this time. Thomas Cromwell understood that is was important for Henry to have an alliance with a European nation. There were several attempts made for the king to consider a French wife and then there was the niece of Charles V, Christina of Denmark, dowager Duchess of Milan. Unfortunately coming by a foreign bride who hadn’t heard of Henry’s track record wasn’t easy, but the Duke of Cleves had interest and finally settled on an agreement that did not require Anne to bring a dowry with her to the marriage. An alliance with England and no dowry would have been a very appealing trade-off for the duke.

Not long after their initial meeting Henry VIII quickly realized that he did not wish to marry Anne of Cleves – however, it was too late to back out. He had to go through with the marriage.

Henry VIII wed Anne of Cleves on the 6th of January 1540. On their wedding night, after Henry claims that he was not able to consummate the relationship, the door was opened for discussion regarding ending the union. Whether or not this was intentional on his part we will never know, but it led to the ultimate proceedings against the king’s marriage to Anne of Cleves.

 

Here is the story of the fall of Anne of Cleves:

On the 25th day of June, a day after Midsummer, Henry VIII requested Anne of Cleves to Richmond Palace. He suggested that the location would be beneficial for her health – with the fresh air and sunshine. About two weeks later the king sent some lords to Richmond to present Anne with the news that her marriage to him was unlawful. With that the king was free to marry whomever he would like. This was also the day that they informed her that she was no longer allowed to be called queen and from that point on she was to be called Lady Anne of Cleves

Henry VIII on Anne of Cleves (In the hand of Henry VIII)

The King’s declaration about his marriage with Anne of Cleves.

When the first communication was had with him for it he was glad to hearken to it, trusting to have [some assured] friend, as he much doubted the Emperor, France and the bishop of Rome, and he had also heard so much of her beauty and virtue. But when he saw her for the first time at Rochester, he was glad he had kept free from making any [pact or bond] till then; for he liked her so ill he was sorry she had come and he considered if it were possible to break off. The Great Master, the Admiral that now is, and the Master of the Horse can bear witness of his misliking. The lord of Essex, if examined, can or has declared what he said to him after his repair to Greenwich. As he is condemned to die he will not damn [his soul, but declare what the King said, not only at the time but continually till] the day of marriage and many times after, whereby his lack of consent will appear; and also lack of the will and power to consummate the same; “wherein both he, my physicians, the Lord Privy Seal that now is, Hennage and Denny can, and I doubt not will, testify according to truth; which is, that I never for love to the woman consented to marry; nor yet, if she brought maidenhead with her, took any from her by true carnal copulation.

This is my brief, true and perfect declaration.

Source: ‘Henry VIII: June 1540, 21-30’, in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15, 1540, ed. James Gairdner and R H Brodie (London, 1896), pp. 376-412

6 July 1540; Marillac to Montmorency

…Knows not whether for some probability there may be in the talk of which he wrote on the 1st in cipher, or only for some diminution of love and new affection to another lady, this Queen has been sent to Richmond. The King, who promised to follow her in two days, has not done so, and his going thither is not spoken of, for the route he has prescribed for his progress does not lie in that direction. Now they say in this Court that the said lady has left for fear of the plague in this town; which is false, for there is no talk at present of plague, and if there was any suspicion of it, this King would not stay for any affair however great, as [he is] the most timid person that could be in such a case.

Source: ‘Henry VIII: July 1540, 1-10’, in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15, 1540, ed. James Gairdner and R H Brodie (London, 1896), pp. 412-436.

7 July 1540; The Divorce of Anne of Cleves (Tunstall)

The original depositions subscribed with the hands of such as here followeth.” The assertion of the King’s Majesty. The depositions of the Lord Chancellor, the Lord of Canterbury, the Duke of Norfolk, the Duke of Suffolk, the Earl of Southampton, the Bishop of Durham; the Duke of Suffolk; the Earl of Southampton, Lord Privy Seal; the Lord Admiral; Sir Anthony Browne, Master of the Horse; Sir Thomas Hennege, Mr. Anthony Denny of the Privy Chamber; Lord Cobham, Sir Thomas Wriothsley, one of the King’s principal secretaries, Mr. Dr. Chamber, Mr. Dr. Butts, the ladies Rutland, Rochford and Egecomb, and the letter of the late lord Cromwell.
Addition to the list at foot in another hand: “The Queen‘s letter to the King and the Queen‘s letter to her brother.

Source: ‘Henry VIII: July 1540, 1-10’, in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15, 1540, ed. James Gairdner and R H Brodie (London, 1896), pp. 412-436.


The Depositions

The deposition of Henry VIII., Signed: Henry R.

The depositions of the Lord Chancellor (Lord Audeley of Walden), the Archbishop of Canterbury, the dukes of Norfolk and Suffolk, the Earl of Southampton, and the Bishop of Durham (Cuthbert Tunstall).

That after the Queen was brought to Greenwich, at her first arrival, in order to ascertain whether such promises as were made for the clearing of the espousals or marriage between the Queen and the duke of Lorraine were performed, the King had put off the espousing of the Queen two days, and the same evening entered communication by his counsel with them that were her conductors as to “what they had brought in that matter”; who said they had brought nothing at all in writing. Yet at Windsor it was promised that the said espousals should be clearly put out of doubt; and thereupon Dr. Wotton, then resident at Cleves, was instructed to solicit the clearing thereof, “as he, brought forth before the ambassadors, avouched that he had done.” Yet the conductors of the Queen made a light matter of it, saying that it was done in their minority and had never after taken any effect. At which the King was marvellously discontent, and would have stayed the solemnization, but that the conductors of the Queen promised shortly after their return home to send such a discharge as should put all out of doubt. This promise not only have they not fulfilled, but they have sent such a writing for discharge (not being authentic) as puts the matter in much more doubt, “couching the words of that sort that th’espousals by them spoken of to have been made long ago may be taken for espousals not only de futuro but also de presenti.” Thus “it appeareth plainly the King’s marriage not to be cleared as was promised, but to remain more intrykyd, and the condition of the clearing thereof, put always thereunto by the King’s Majesty, not to be fulfilled in any wise by them that so promised.”

Signed: Thomas Audeley, Chauncellor: T. Cantuariensis: T. Norfolk: Charlys Soffolke: W. Southampton: Cuthbert Duresme.
In Tunstall’s hand, pp. 3.

Source: ‘Henry VIII: July 1540, 1-10’, in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15, 1540, ed. James Gairdner and R H Brodie (London, 1896), pp. 412-436.

The deposition of the Duke of Suffolk, Lord Great Master

In the beginning of the treaty he noted specially that the King constantly affirmed that he would do nothing in the matter of the marriage unless the precontract between the lady Anne of Cleves and the marquis of Lorraine were first cleared. Whereupon the commissioners of the dukes of Saxe and Cleves promised on her coming to England to bring the full and evident clearing thereof, which they did not. The King, not content to be so handled, and as earnest as before to have that matter cleared, deferred the solemnization from Sunday until Tuesday “to compass the end; wherein, the earl of Essex travailed with the King’s Highness apart, and so that matter passed over.” He saw that the King liked not the Queen‘s person, and thought that the King “would have been glad if the solemnization might then to the world have been disappointed, without note of breach of his Highness’s behalf.” Signed.

Source: ‘Henry VIII: July 1540, 1-10’, in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15, 1540, ed. James Gairdner and R H Brodie (London, 1896), pp. 412-436.

The deposition of the Earl of Southampton, Lord Privy Seal (William Fitzwilliam)

That, when admiral, he received the Queen at Calais. Upon first sight of her, considering it was no time to dispraise her whom so many had by reports and painting so much extolled, he did by his letters much praise her and was very sorry to perceive the King, upon sight of her, so to mislike her person. The earl of Essex laid sore to his charge that he had so much “praised the Queen by his letters from Calais” and declared his intention to turn the King’s miscontentment upon him. He answered he thought his praise to good purpose if he could have done any good by it, the matter being so far passed. He was sorry to see the King proceed so coldly with the marriage, the solemnization being deferred from Sunday to Tuesday, “and much fault found for the clearing of the precontract and want of a commission;” the ending of which controversy the earl of Essex, repairing secretly to the King, did procure; but what he said to the King the Earl cannot tell. That, eight days after the marriage, the earl of Essex told him that “the Queen was then a maid for the King’s Highness,” who had no affection for her; and a little before Easter the King declared to him that the marriage had not been consummated. Signed.

Source: ‘Henry VIII: July 1540, 1-10’, in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15, 1540, ed. James Gairdner and R H Brodie (London, 1896), pp. 412-436.

The deposition of Lord Russell, Lord Admiral (John Russell)

That he saw the King at his first view of the Queen at Rochester marvellously astonished and abashed. And the next day the King asked him if he thought the woman so fair and of such beauty as report had been made of her; to which he answered that he took her not for fair but to be of a brown complexion; and the King said, “Alas, whom should men trust? I promise you I see no such thing in her as hath been showed unto me of her, and am ashamed that men hath so praised her as they have done, and I like her not.” I saw his Highness was sore troubled at the time. All which matter he told to Sir Anthony Browne, who declared that the King had shewed the like to him. Signed: J. Russell, L. A.

Source: ‘Henry VIII: July 1540, 1-10’, in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15, 1540, ed. James Gairdner and R H Brodie (London, 1896), pp. 412-436.

The deposition of Sir Anthony Browne, Master of the Horse

That being sent to the Queen at Rochester by the King on new year’s day with a message that he had brought her a new years’ gift, he was never more dismayed in all his life to see the lady so far unlike that which was reported; but on his return he said nothing of this to the King; nor durst not. When the King entered to embrace and kiss her, he noted on his countenance a discontentment and misliking of her person, and the King tarried not to speak with her twenty words. The King that night deferred sending the presents that he had prepared for her, viz., a partlet furred with sables and sable skins for her neck, with a muffler furred and a cap, but sent them in the morning by Sir Anthony with a cold message. When returning from Rochester to Greenwich in his barge, the King said to him very sadly and pensively, “I see nothing in this woman as men report of her, and I marvel that wise men would make such report as they have done.” At which he was abashed, fearing for his brother, the earl of Southampton, who had written in her praise.

That lady Browne, his wife, departed, who was appointed to wait upon the Queen, told him before the marriage how she saw in the Queen such fashion and manner of bringing up so gross that in her judgment the King should never heartily love her. That on the evening before the marriage he heard the King say he had a great yoke to enter into, and the next morning the King prepared himself so slackly for chapel that he showed he went to do an act to which he was not moved by his entire and hearty consent, and said to the earl of Essex some words which seemed to mean that “he must needs.”
By the King’s behaviour before and after the marriage he judgeth that the King did never in his heart favour the lady to marry her if outward respects had not enforced him to that act. Signed: Antone Browne.

Source: ‘Henry VIII: July 1540, 1-10’, in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15, 1540, ed. James Gairdner and R H Brodie (London, 1896), pp. 412-436.

The deposition of Sir Thomas Hennage, knight

Ever since the King saw the Queen he had never liked her; and said as often as he went to bed to her, he mistrusted the Queen‘s virginity, by reason of the looseness of her breasts and other tokens; and the marriage had never been consummated. Signed.

Source: ‘Henry VIII: July 1540, 1-10’, in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15, 1540, ed. James Gairdner and R H Brodie (London, 1896), pp. 412-436.

The deposition of Master Anthony Denny, gentleman of the King's Chamber

That he had continually praised the Queen to the King, who did not approve such praises, “but said ever she was no such as she was praised for,” and afterwards upon continual praisings the King told him, as a confidential servant, that he could not induce himself to have affection for her, for she was not as reported and had her breasts so slack and other parts of her body in such sort, that he suspected her virginity, and that he could never consummate the marriage. In reply he lamented the state of princes to be far worse than that of poor men who could choose for themselves. This communication, he thinks, was before Lent; and the King has since said things to the same effect. Signed.

Source: ‘Henry VIII: July 1540, 1-10’, in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15, 1540, ed. James Gairdner and R H Brodie (London, 1896), pp. 412-436.

The deposition of Lord Cobham (Sir William Brooke)

That the younger Palant, at his being here, said to him that he was sorry to see the King’s Majesty, being so virtuous a prince, enter this matrimony, (fn. 11)for the papists had sued a dispensation to make it good against a former contract, which he thought if his Majesty knew he would not enter it for any worldly good, because he thought it contrary to the laws of God. Westm., July 6, 32 Hen. VIII. Signed: George Cobham.
In Wriothesley’s hand, p. 1.

Source: ‘Henry VIII: July 1540, 1-10’, in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15, 1540, ed. James Gairdner and R H Brodie (London, 1896), pp. 412-436.

Deposition of Sir Thomas Wriothesley, king's principal secretary

Detailing two conversations he had with lord Cromwell [the earl of Essex] in June last. On June 6th or 7th, when lord Cromwell came home to Austin Friars from the Court, he told him (Sir T.) that one thing rested in his head which troubled him, that the King liked not the Queen, nor did ever like her from the beginning, and that the marriage had not been consummated. He (Sir T.) said he thought some way might be devised to relieve the King, to which lord Cromwell answered that it was a great matter. The next day he asked lord Cromwell to devise some way for the relief of the King, for if he remained in this grief and trouble, they should all one day smart for it. To which lord Cromwell answered that it was true, but that it was a great matter. “Marry,” said Sir T., “I grant, but let the remedy be searched for.” “Well,” said lord Cromwell, and then brake off from him. Signed.
Hol., pp.
2.

Source: ‘Henry VIII: July 1540, 1-10’, in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15, 1540, ed. James Gairdner and R H Brodie (London, 1896), pp. 412-436.

The deposition of Master Doctor Chamber

His evidence as to the nonconsummation of the marriage. Signed: John Chamber.

Source: ‘Henry VIII: July 1540, 1-10’, in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15, 1540, ed. James Gairdner and R H Brodie (London, 1896), pp. 412-436.

 The deposition of Master Doctor Buttes

His evidence as to the nonconsummation of the marriage. Signed: W. Butt.

Source: ‘Henry VIII: July 1540, 1-10’, in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15, 1540, ed. James Gairdner and R H Brodie (London, 1896), pp. 412-436.

The depositions of Ladies Rutland, Rochford, and Edgecombe

“Such communication as was between the Queen‘s grace and the ladies of Rutland, Rochford, and Edgcomb, the Tuesday or Wednesday before midsummer day last at Wyssmestre.”

To the effect that the Queen had confessed to them the nonconsummation of the marriage. Signed: Elynor Rutland: Jane Rocheford: Kateryne Egecombe.

‘Source; Henry VIII: July 1540, 1-10’, in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15, 1540, ed. James Gairdner and R H Brodie (London, 1896), pp. 412-436.


11 July 1540; Anne of Cleves to Henry VIII

Was told by divers of the Council of the doubts concerning their marriage, and how petition was made that the same might be examined by the clergy. Consented to this. Though the case must needs be hard and sorrowful, for the great love she bears to his most noble person; yet, having more regard to God and his truth than to any worldly affection, she accepts the judgment. Asks the King to take her as one of his most humble servants, and so to determine of her as she may sometimes have the fruition of his presence. The Lords and others of his Council now with her have put her in comfort thereof, and that the King will take her as his sister. Richmond, 11 July 32 Hen. VII Subscribed: “Your Majesty’s most humble sister and servant Anne dochtter the Cleyffys.”
Copy, pp. 3. Headed by Wriothesley: Copy of the Lady [Anne’s] first letter to the King’s [highness].

Source: ‘Henry VIII: July 1540, 11-20’, in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15, 1540, ed. James Gairdner and R H Brodie (London, 1896), pp. 436-445.

Notarial instrument recording that, 11 July 32 Hen. VIII., in a lofty chamber called the Queen‘s Inner Chamber, in the palace of Richmond, Surr., in presence of Charles duke of Suffolk and others, Anne sister of Wm. duke of Cleves, &c., lately married to the King and divorced, freely signed certain letters of consent to the said divorce, as follows:—

Letter of 11 July recited (see § 1).

This was done in presence of Ant. Huse, notary, Charles duke of Suffolk, master of the Household (prefectus aule), Wm. earl of Southampton, Privy Seal and Chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster, Sir Ric. Ryche, chancellor of Augmentations, Thos. Wriothesley, chief secretary, Ric. Berde, esquire, lady Eleanor, wife of Thos. earl of Rutland, ladies Joan Rocheforth and Catherine Egecombe, widows, Dorothy wife of John Wyngfeld, Anne Josselyn and Eliz. Rastall. Signed and sealed (seals much injured) by Suffolk, Southampton, Wriothesley, and Ryche.
Parchment.

Source: ‘Henry VIII: July 1540, 11-20’, in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15, 1540, ed. James Gairdner and R H Brodie (London, 1896), pp. 436-445.

16 July 1540; Anne of Cleves to Henry VIII

Thanks him for his goodness, favour, and liberality, declared by the King’s own letters and the report of the Great Master, the Privy Seal and Secretary. Will ever remain his sister and servant, according to her answer made at the first opening of this matter, from which she has never varied nor will vary. If anyone has said the contrary it is without her consent. Richmond, 16 July. Subscribed as “sister and servant,” without signature.
Two copies, each p.
1. Headed by Wriothesley: Copy of the Lady Anne’s second letter to the King’s Majesty.

Source: ‘Henry VIII: July 1540, 11-20’, in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15, 1540, ed. James Gairdner and R H Brodie (London, 1896), pp. 436-445.

21 July 1540; Anne of Cleves to her brother, Duke of Cleves

Perceives by his letter of the 13th to the king of England, her “most dear and most kind brother,” that he takes the matter lately determined between them somewhat to heart. Informs him that she consented to the examination and determination, “wherein I had more respect (as beseemed me) to truth than to any worldly affection that might move me to the contrary, and did the rather condescend thereunto for that my body remaineth in the integrity which I brought into this realm.” The King has adopted her as his sister, and uses her with more liberality than she or her brother could well wish. Is well satisfied. The King’s friendship for him will not be impaired for this matter unless the fault should be in himself. Thinks it necessary to write this, and that she purposes to live here, lest for want of true knowledge he should take the matter otherwise than he ought. Subscribed: Anna Duchess born of Cleves, Gulik, Geldre, and Berge, your loving sister.

Source: ‘Henry VIII: July 1540, 21-31’, in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15, 1540, ed. James Gairdner and R H Brodie (London, 1896), pp. 445-481.

Statement of the provision made by Henry VIII. for Anne of Cleves:—
1. She will be considered as the King’s sister, and have precedence over all ladies in England, after the Queen and the King’s children. 2. She shall have an annual income of 8,000 nobles; and 500l. st. have been given to her officers. 3. Two manors, Richmond and Blechingley, having splendid houses and parks of 6 leagues and 2 leagues. 4. She shall have hangings, plate, and furniture, and (5), money for her household till her income is sufficient. 6. “Pretiosissimas [vestes].” 7. Jewels and pearls. 8. A good number of officers, the heads being nobles.
Lat., pp. 2. Endd. by Wriothesley: The copy of the remembrance given to Olisleger’s nephew.

Source: ‘Henry VIII: July 1540, 21-31’, in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15, 1540, ed. James Gairdner and R H Brodie (London, 1896), pp. 445-481.

21 July 1540; Marillac to Francis I

[London], 21 July:—The talk of which he wrote, about an objection proposed to the marriage with Anne of Cleves, has led to the matter being determined by sentence of all the bishops confirmed and authorised by Parliament. The marriage has been declared null, and consequently has been followed by separation; this King having first sworn in presence of his Privy Council not to have had any knowledge with the said lady by which the marriage could be alleged to have been consummated on any other ground than that of the mere consent, which, he says, was of no effect because she had previously promised the son of the duke of Lorraine, and consequently this King was not bound by the marriage treaty, having made it in ignorance of this. Upon which the said lady, being required to consent that the bishops should be the judges, freely granted it; although her brother’s ambassador says that he had often warned her to grant nothing to the prejudice of her own rights or her brother’s estate, but could get no answer except that she would obey the King her lord, pointing out the great kindness he had used towards her and her firm intention to endure all he thought fit and to remain always in this country and not return to her own. The King, being informed of this good will, has provided her with an honourable estate, to maintain which he leaves her for life the places of Richmond, Autel (doubtless a misreading of Antel, i.e., Ampthill) and More, of 12,000 crs. rent. He has nevertheless made the curates and their vicars announce to their parishes that she is no longer to be called queen, but Lady Anne of Cleves; to the great regret of this people, who loved and esteemed her much as the sweetest, most gracious and kindest queen they ever had or would desire. It is commonly said that this King will marry a lady of great beauty, daughter of Norfolk’s deceased brother. If permitted to write what he hears, he would say this marriage has already taken place and is consummated; but as this is kept secret he dare not yet certify it as true.
The prince of Salerno, who came hither only to see the country, having been feasted both in this Court and in some of the most beautiful places this King has, Windsor and Hampton Court, left, after eight days, with the seigneur d’Avila, of the Emperor’s chamber. It is since heard that the brother of the Duke of Ferrara, who was in Flanders with the Emperor, will be here immediately upon the same business. Parliament finishes to-morrow. What it has concluded is not yet known in detail, but will soon be printed and published; and, even as regards religion, all agrees with what was determined last year; which only differs from that held by the Church, as regards obedience to the Holy See and Orders of religious persons. One novelty is spoken of as concluded although not yet published: it is that all strangers dwelling in this realm shall depart before Michaelmas next, except only those engaged in commerce, who shall not keep house unless they be married or have letters of naturalization. At this many poor people are much taken aback (esbahys), especially Flemings, of whom there are here a great number.
French. Modern transcript, pp. 4.

Source: ‘Henry VIII: July 1540, 21-31’, in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15, 1540, ed. James Gairdner and R H Brodie (London, 1896), pp. 445-481.

6 August 1540; Marillac to Francis I

This King being lately with a small company at Hampton Court, ten miles hence, supped at Richmond with the Queen that was, so merrily that some thought he meant to reinstate her, but others think it was done to get her consent to the dissolution of the marriage and make her subscribe what she had said thereupon, which is not only what they wanted but also what she thinks they expected (ce qu’elle estime qu’ilz pensoient). The latter opinion is the more likely, as the King drew her apart in company with the three first councillors he had, who are not commonly called in to such confidences. Thinks it would show great inconstancy to take her back now, and moreover she did not sup with him as she did when she was Queen, but at another table adjoining his, as other ladies who are not of the blood do when he eats in company.
French. Modern transcript, pp. 5. Headed: “Despesche au Roy, du 6 jour d’Aoust, 1540 (Et a Monseigneur le Connestable pour l’heure nihil).”

Source: ‘Henry VIII: August 1540, 1-10’, in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15, 1540, ed. James Gairdner and R H Brodie (London, 1896), pp. 481-488

I am certain Anne of Cleves never wished to marry Henry VIII, but as a women she didn’t have a choice – it was up to her brother, the duke, to decide who she should marry. I do not doubt that she had heard the stories about the English king’s previous queens but we will never know if she ever voiced her concerns over it.

In the end she outlived Henry VIII, Katherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Katherine Howard, Katherine Parr and King Edward VI.

Sources: 

All sources are listed under the quoted material

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2 thoughts on “The Fall of a Queen: Anne of Cleves

  1. Had Anne Given the King two sons instead of two daughters Lucy and Elizabeth Chalfant 1540 there would be no leagal attempt to find out whether she had had a son in 1541. Court papter show the court made inquiry to which the Lady Anne replied: ” I have had no sons My Lord King Henry of England”. Satisified the court left her to enjoy her enormous good forturne and the two girls were raised by William and Margaret Chalfant: Stewards at Windsor CAstle 4th cousins of the Blounts. That line proceeds into the 20th century where my mother Mildred M. Cookston -Rice with J1 A mt. DNA from Central Spain gave birth to the heirs of these Two Daughters of Henry Tudor. Further she is the 17th great grand dauther off John of Gaunt 3rd son of Edward IIIand his Spanish Wife . Their son Son, Uncle of Margaret Beaufort is our 16th great grandfather. Rice’s of NEbraska 194822

    1. Utter nonsense. You are living in fantasy land, Dale. Henry didn’t have any children with Anna of Cleves. It was just an unverified vicious rumour that she was having a son by Henry Viii after her annulment. I don’t know where you’re family history is from but I suggest you get a more factual DNA based genealogy done. This is based on fiction and fantasy.

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